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Navigating Career Decisions without analysis paralysis

Navigating Career Decisions without analysis paralysis

We’ve all had to navigate career decisions at one time or another, and those kinds of decisions are never easy. For many, careers are one of those things that generally are foundational to our livelihoods, and are the tools by which you support your life and family. More than that, for many, your career is where you will spend most of your time. So given that, its not uncommon for decisions in your career to be fraught with stress and dread.

I know there have been a lot of times in my life, where my wife and I have had to stop and examine our options and decide what the next step will be. I don’t pretend to be an expert on this kind of thing, but I do think that my wife and I have developed a pretty good process for weighing these options, and I thought I’d share some thoughts here.

What do I mean by “Career Decisions”?

So before we go any further, I think its worth taking a step back and defining terms. What do I mean by “Career Decisions”? For me, a career decision is a decision on a current or next step in your career. And ultimately where you see things going next. Some examples of these kinds of decisions are:

  • Do I take a new position with my current company?
  • Do I take a management position?
  • Do I change employers?
  • Do I change teams?
  • Do I move into a new industry?
  • Where do I see myself in 6 months, 1 year, or 5 years?
  • Do I ask for a raise?
  • Do I take on more responsibility?

These kinds of decisions are the kind, that when they come along, can change the course of your career. They affect not just your current situation, but also the next steps and opportunities in the future. And a lot of times, these types of decisions I find can inflict pretty significant “analysis paralysis” (speaking from Experience).

For this blog post I wanted to take a step back and look at some of the things I’ve learned to keep in mind, and consider the alternatives that I’m faced with. This is by no means an exhaustive list, but it is meant to give you a starting point for these kinds of decisions.

Careers are like sharks, they move forward…or die.

The first part of this discussion, I almost didn’t write here, but it goes to general mindset, and keeping a good frame of mind for ensuring success. If you look at life in general, all living things in this world essentially have 2 states of being, they are growing or they are dying. There isn’t a third option that works. And over my professional career, I’ve come to realize that careers are no different.

When I graduated college, my father looked me and gave me two pieces of career advice, and this is the first.

“A career is like a shark, if it stops moving forward, it dies.”

Now, when I was a kid, I was a shark fanatic, and when I got older and they offered shark week on discovery…that was mandatory television for me every year. For those who haven’t spent countless hours studying sharks as a kid, here’s the basics.

The way a shark’s gills are structured, they have to have water moving through them for the Shark to breathe. Unlike fish, who are able to extract the air from the water even while sitting still. What this means, is that if a shark ever stops moving, it will suffocate.

See the source image

And in much the same regard, Careers function the exact same way. If you aren’t moving forward, and by that I mean:

  • Growing in your knowledge
  • Being challenged in new ways
  • Learning new skills
  • Investigating new ideas
  • Embracing change

Then your overall value is diminished as a whole. Think about it this way, take car buying, which is a topic most can relate to. You have two cars in front of you, both owned by different owners.

Honda Accord A: Is a nice car, it runs and will get you from point A to point B. The owner did an oil change about once a year, and it was inspected every year. But that’s all that was done. The interior is stock standard, the seats are faded, the interior is clean but has some stains.

Honda Accord B: Is a nice car, same year as car A. But the owner took it in for regular checkups, oil changes, etc. But in addition the previous owner, upgraded the interior to leather, replaced the stereo system. Upgraded the engine to be more fuel efficient, and other optional improvements.

Now of the two cars, if you are in the market, which would you rather have? And if it was only $5000 more for the second car, would you consider paying more.

At the end of the day, this is largely how employers will view you. The most important fact is that there is a direct correlation between how valuable of a resource you are, and the opportunities you will have. So everything about what you are doing in your career now feeds the future and that value.

When you are presented with a new opportunity / decision, it’s ok to take “some” time to think?

In my experience, no one should ever put you on the spot, and that’s just bad business etiquette. It is 100% reasonable to take some time to think about any major changes you are planning to make. This is your life and you have a right to take a breath and think about it.

Now that being said, one thing to be careful of, you have the right to a reasonable amount of time. I once had a situation where I recommended a friend to my current employer, and they made them an offer. And my friend wanted 1 month to make a decision. This caused a lot of frustration with between both parties, as they wanted too long to make a decision. A good rule of thumb I’ve found is to do the following:

  • Be transparent with the other person: If you need to talk to your spouse, tell them that. I once had a case where my wife was away for a week and I got presented with an opportunity. I told them, “I would like to talk to my wife, she’s out of town, can I get you an answer next week?”
  • Give them an indication when they can expect a response: I never understood the “I’ll think about it” and walk away. It’s very reasonable and easy to give the other person a time frame to expect a reply.

I find that this communication will make it easier on everyone, it gives a clear framing of when responses are coming through. It creates an opportunity for both sides to show respect and courtesy, and if they aren’t willing to do that, it’s another data point in the decision.

Everything has trade-offs… even staying where you are

Now that you’ve been presented with a decision or opportunity, you have to start into thinking about it and making a decision. This is the hard part, and to be honest I do want to take a step and identify the number one mistake I’ve made, and I’ve seen other make in this situation.

When we start looking at the choice, say it’s to take a new job with a new company, we start looking at things like pros / cons, which is a very good thing, and start looking at:

  • How much will I make?
  • What is the commute like?
  • What kind of work will I be doing?
  • Is it something I want to do?
  • What’s the work life balance?
  • How much travel?

But the number one mistake here is that we will fill out that T-Chart and then make a decision based on that alone. But the biggest thing I find is important to understand is that I should do this exercise twice. For the following:

  • Pros / Cons of taking the new job
  • Pros / Cons of staying where I am

There are trade-offs to staying where you are, and those trade-off should figure into your decision. For example, some questions you should examine when you consider the question of “Should I stay where I am”:

  • Is there opportunity for advancement?
  • Do I see myself growing if I stay here?
  • Does it benefit my family to stay?
  • What does my financial growth opportunity look like?
  • Will rejecting this impact potential new opportunities?

And these question should be come part of your decision, as to what to do next. Let me give you an example, if you decide to stay at your current position, instead of taking a move that would increase your payment potential. Do that once, not a problem, but due it to often and you’ll find normal raises price you out of moves later. There’s something to be said for a “being a bargain” in job market.

Here’s an example, let’s say for the sake of argument, you have a job that’s “fine”, doing support that makes $40,000 / year. You want to eventually be a developer and move from support to feature work.

NOTE: This is not a commentary on support, I worked support and its a great and challenging profession, and I have friends who have worked in support for their whole careers and are way more successfully then I could ever hope to be.

But if you have your current job, making $40,000 / year, and ever year that you do good work, you get roughly a $1,000 cost-of-living increase.

So not bad overall, and you are working in the background, on side projects and other opportunities to build your skills for your next move to being a developer.

After a few years, your pay scale looks like this:

  • $41,000
  • $42,000
  • $43,000
  • $44,000

And now you find out about a developer opportunity, but aren’t sure if the timings write, and they are willing to hire you at $46,000 / year. A little pay bump, and a chance to move over. But you decide the timing isn’t right, and decide not to take it. But you find out that the normal developer salaries in your area are around $47-50,000 / year. If you continue in your current job for 5 more years. Your salary is around $49,000 / year, and you are on the higher end of the salary range, and now are more of a risk to a new employers. The reason I say that is that you don’t have the direct experience that they are going to see from other employers.

Fast forward another 5 years, and you are now priced out and having to consider a pay-cut to move to the job you want.

So there was an unseen cost to staying in the current position, and passing on that opportunity. If you had gone to the development position, you could have grown your experience and made yourself grow faster and had more opportunities available to you.

Now I realize the above has a lot of assumption and is very simplistic, but I do believe it illustrates the point, that the cost of doing nothing, does have a cost, it is not cost neutral.

Money is not the only factor

Now I realize this is an odd segue given the above discussion, but one of the things my wife and I do when we consider career moves and decisions is to make a list and leave off the financial component. At the end of the day, there are a lot of elements to a career other than the financial component, and honestly if finance is your only motivation, its going to make for a pretty miserable existence.

This relates to the other elements of the job, things like:

  • Does the job require travel (could be a good thing or a bad thing)?
  • Will this help me grow?
  • What new opportunities will this move afford me?
  • What is work life balance going to be?

I once had a person interview to work on my team at a previous company, and he took the week to think about the employment offer as he had a competing offer. On Monday, the next week, he came back and took our offer and weeks later confided in me that it was at lower pay. When I asked why he gave the most eye opening answer.

That Friday night, at 6pm, he went to both places of employment to see how many cars were in the parking lot, and every night that weekend. The other employer while offering more money, had the same cars in the parking lot all week and most of the weekend, people leaving at 7-8pm at night after 12-14 hour days. Which was a really amazing observation, while our offer was lower, everyone went home to their families most nights.

How does this set me up for the future?

Another key question, that I learned very early on in my career is that you should always take a step back and ask yourself this question. Everything you do in your professional life is a part of a portfolio of work that can open up new opportunities in the future. That’s why its important to make sure that the things you are doing, are ultimately building that portfolio.

So let’s talk an example here, if I’m going back to that example (which was me at one point). You work in a support job, and you want to become more of a developer, and you are presented with the choice from above.

If you stay in the support role, the following happen with regard to your next job:

  • Learn more about how to work with escalations.
  • Continue to learn about the low level details of software applications.

Now if you took the developer job, it would mean:

  • Focus on growing my skills as a developer.
  • Work on development projects.
  • Potential mentors for growing in that space.

I know overly simplistic example, but it makes my point. The idea is here you should have a clear picture of the kind of work you want to do, and make sure that the current job sets you up for the future.

Loyalty is a two-way street

This is the tough one, that I find impacts a lot of decisions for careers, and that’s a sense of loyalty to your current team, employer, manager, company, etc. And I want to stress that loyalty is absolutely important, and something I value very much. Ultimately I find that its the glue that holds a team together. I’ve also personally had a lot of relationships over my career that I would gladly take a bullet for those people.

That being said, I do find too that loyalty is a two-way street and something that should measure into your decisions, but you need to make sure that you are taking care of yourself as well. And sometimes misplaced senses of loyalty can be a very dangerous thing.

At the end of the day, I’m of the belief that there is a responsibility and an “agreement” between yourself and your current employer to do the following:

  • Provide growth opportunities
  • Provide learning opportunities
  • Provide ability to recognize achievements
  • Provide a safe and constructive work environment

And then in turn, you as an employee are agreeing to the following:

  • Do your best work to achieve the goals and objectives.
  • Be a professional and do your part to support the work environment.
  • Take advantage of the growth and learning opportunities provided.

Now over the past few years I’ve always tried to have very open discussions with my managers around these items on a regular basis. The idea being that they should get a return on their investment in me, and I should get a return on my investment in them.

And then that agreement to me is the foundation of the loyalty with the team I work with.

Now given the above, I do believe there is a certain amount of responsibility from your current employer to provide the best opportunities they can, and I would recommend having an open discussion about those opportunities. Ultimately at the end of the day, if someone is able to offer you a better return on your investment, it should at least be considered.

But I’ve been in scenarios, where I had managers that would “gaslight” their team into a misplaced sense of loyalty that convinced them t hat considering leaving was an “act of treason.” And those kinds of things can be avoided pretty easily if you think of this in investment terms.

If you’re the smartest person in the room, find a new room.

I mentioned at the top of this post, that my father gave me two pieces of career advice when I graduated. And this is the second. The most important thing to remember is that you must grow for your career and ultimately you need to be challenged. And if you are the smartest person in the room, you are not being challenged.

There is something amazing, about being in a room where you aren’t the smartest person, and the opportunity to learn new things. A great term a college professor gave for this is “productive discomfort”, which fundamentally is the idea that the only way you grow is by putting yourself into a situation where you aren’t 100% comfortable.

It’s very much akin to the idea of learning to swim, my son who stands 3 feet tall, can’t learn to swim in 12″ deep water. There’s no challenge that forces him to push himself, but if we put him in water where he can touch if he needs but is high enough to justify swimming, it might not be as comfortable in the beginning, but it will yield returns.

So as you start to build out your career, one practice that has served me well is to seek out situations of Productive Discomfort to make sure that I push myself in new directions.

Goal setting and the year in review

Goal setting and the year in review

So it’s officially 2020, and a new year brings with it all kinds of things. Retrospective, hope, dreams, and a variety of other feelings. I’m not a big party-er and have never been a massive fan of New Years Eve, but I do have to say in recent years, I have really come to appreciate two elements of new years as an important time of year for me. The first being retrospection, its a chance to look back at the year and be honest with ourselves about how things have gone. A chance to look at what worked, and what didn’t and have an honest conversation with yourself.

The second part I’ve come to enjoy is planning for the new year, sitting down and looking at my life and finding new ways to grow as a person, and improve things for the better. There’s something very empowering about sitting down and seeing a wealth of possibilities and excitement about the future prospects and opportunities that are ahead.

Now for most people, this is where the most dreaded word comes up, and its RESOLUTIONS. We’ve all heard it, and probably had it happen to us. The grand self-lie that is a resolution. Believe me over the years I’ve left a path of broken resolutions behind me, and as those who read this blog regularly know. I tend to read a lot on the subject of success, goals, and similar topics. I don’t claim to have an answer here, and over the past few years have come to the conclusion that everyone’s mileage on any option for trying to grow will vary.

Now I want to be clear about one thing here, I’m going to use the ever present weight loss example, I consider myself overweight, it is something I have struggled with I do not have the answer, and am not cla,am “throwing shade” on people who use these systems and find success. My experience only.

But what I can do, is call out some of the things I’ve tried, and how they worked out, and tell you what I’ve been finding lately:

Setting SMART Goals:

We’ve all heard this one right, making sure that your goals are “SMART”, they practically drill this into us in grade school, the only “good goals” are SMART goals. And what does SMART mean:

  • Simple
  • Measurable
  • Attainable
  • Reasonable
  • Time Bound

Now, the idea behind this is a good one, the idea behind this approach is make sure your setting goals that can be reached, and that you can verify that you have hit milestones on the path. Believe me, I do love the mantra “What gets measured, matters”, and this is based around it. It’s also though built around the satisfaction of achieving your goals. If you set something that’s measurable and attainable, then you feel pretty great when you hit that goal.

Let’s talk about an example, so an example of a “bad” goal in this model would be, “I’m going to lose weight” to steal the oldest resolution in the book. Now why is this a bad goal, because its not defined, its not something that I can measure (in a meaningful way). So a better goal would be “I’m going to lose 10 lbs, by June.” I can measure it, it has a deadline, its not outlandish by any means. Should be great right.

For a lot of people, this is a great system, and it helps them, but for me, it caused a lot more damage than it helped. The reason being is that a human being can tolerate anything for a time boxed amount of time. Look at people who have survived unimaginable conditions and then are able to return to their lives. But the problem for me, is that by doing this with the new year you aren’t doing anything to make a permanent change in your life.

Let’s go back to our weight loss example, as I’ve got to be honest, this isn’t hypothetical, its what really happened to me (more than once). You set this goal and in January you go after it…I had a coworker once who used to say “Let’s seize the day with vigor and determination never before sen by mankind.” And we’ve all been there right, we all hit the gym, get up early, and go after it.

And then a couple of outcomes happen:And then a couple of outcomes happen:

You start doing great, and by end of january you are down 5 lbs. Feeling amazing and saying “I got this”, at which point you end of convincing yourself “I can slow down, I don’t need to work as hard” and it all falls apart. And before you know it time flies and it’s June, you look at the number and say “I’m a failure”.

You start doing great, and middle of February, you hit your goal of 10 lbs down, you’re proud of yourself, and smart goals works. You move onto other things, and before you know it you fall into bad habits, and June hits and the scale looks pretty familiar, you look at the number and say “I’m a failure”

You stay on track, do what you set out to do, get to june and are down 10 lbs. You feel great, smart goals worked. You have a fun summer and end up back where you started, or god forbid worse off, look at yourself and say “I’m a failure”.

And now your probably saying “For loving the positive elements of new years, this is pretty damn depressing. And I’m not trying to be a debby downer. But this is my experience and as I said above, part of this process is honestly and retrospective. This has been my honest experience.

This is my problem here, SMART goals are built to be very short term focused to get a “job” done, but when it comes to personal growth, the job is never “done”, so the approach is fundamentally flawed. And at the end of the process those words / feelings of “I’m a failure” have a damaging and demoralizing effect that is completely counter productive.

At the end of the day, growth is a journey. And if you continue down this road and you miss your goal you are left with nothing, and feeling like you failed with nothing to show for the effort. I believe there is an old adage about eggs in a single basket for this.

10x Goals:

This is one that got a lot of attention, I’ve read the book the 10x Rule, and I have to say it is insightful,and I found it to be very interesting. For those not familiar the idea is this, take the idea of SMART goals and turn it around a bit. Keep the same ideas of goals being measurable and time boxed but instead of making them attainable, you make them 10x what the attainable goal is.

So take our weight loss example,, instead of saying “I’m going to lose 10 lbs by june” I would say “I’m going to lose 50 lbs by june”. Now before anyone jumps on me, I can do math. The idea is what could you do if you put in 10x the effort. So the idea then is if I put in the work and try to lose 50 lbs by June, one off two outcomes occur:

  • I lose 50 lbs and cheer my success.
  • I lose 30 lbs and I’m still better off than the 10lb goal.

In my experience though the problem is still the same. I haven’t changed behaviors or grown at all, I’ve hit a very finite and fixed in time goal, but the success won’t last. And at the end you still feel like a failure. And now you feel like a bigger one, because not only did you miss the 10x goal,but likely the 1x goal too.

Finite Systems / Infinite Problem:

The crux of the problem I have with the above problems is that they are systems built around finite objectives, being applied to an infinite problem. I don’t want to lose weight, I want to be healthier, I don’t want to learn one thing, but build a foundation for learning. And at the end of the day, we are trying to fit a square peg into a round hole. Personal growth isn’t something that can be timeboxed like that.

Simon Sinek covers this in his book, the “Infinite Game”, which I admit I am still reading now, but here’s a video that gives some of the highlighting principles.

The other problem I have is that in my experience this creates a lot of stress and pressure on yourself, and those words “I’m a failure” whether you say them aloud or not are devastating. If you become too fixated on goals, they can start to feel like a drug high. And I’m speaking from experience here, they become this thing where your life becomes about setting goals, pushing too hard, getting them and that feeling of euphoria, and then its on to the next one.

I was 100% in that boat, for better or worse, and don’t get me wrong I’m proud of any accomplishments I’ve made, but it really does take a toll on you mentally. While it can be satisfying to reach those goals, it isn’t always fulfilling. And if you find yourself questioning where to go next, that can be crippling in a lot of ways.

And now I’ve done it again, we are at the “Kevin, still depressing. Goals are meaningless, growth is meaningless, life is pain…”

Not quite, I’ve been doing a lot of reading and researching and had lots of discussions with people a lot wiser than me, and I’ve found something that in my opinion seems to be working better.

The final problem I have with these systems, is they make one basic assumption, and that is that pursuit of these goals exists in a vacuum. And what I mean by that is take our weightloss example, we say “I’m going to lose 10 lbs by march”, but then I get hurt, need surgery and spend 6 weeks in a cast, and then physical therapy. I know that the goal became unattainable, but I still feel like I failed.

Now again, not just weight loss, but let’s say I said “I’m going to put my phone away after dinner to spend more time with my family”. And then I get a smart watch which lets me check email without my phone, or I work with customers all over the world that have to call at off hours, then I feel like a failure due to circumstances outside of my control.

Goals vs Values:

Now I can’t take credit for this, there is a psychological principle called value based living, and the idea being this. Here’s a video that does a way better job than I ever could at summarizing it.

So looking at the above, if we get away from these ideas of goals, and look more at what we as a person value. That is what drives us, and that is what matters. And as long as the actions we take align with those values, the journey is part of the reward. If you watched the video above with Simon Sinek, this probably sounds familiar, and that should be no surprise. There is a direct through line between his concepts of actions being driven by values and value based living.

So the next question is how does this work any differently? How do I grow and push myself without goals? Is this just symantics at the end of the day. I don’t think so, but let me talk about what this journey has been like for me, and you can judge.

Step 1 : Change your definition:

One thing that my wife and I are really trying to embrace is a family mission statement, and we are in the process of writing that now. When we are done I will probably do a blog post on that too. But along with that, we as a family have focused our energy and decisions about what we do around this motto for lack of a better term.

There are only two outcomes to any action, success or you learn something.

That’s it, not ground breaking, and truth be told we stole it from the movie Meet the Robinson’s, which has a similar sentiment, “From failure you learn, success not so much”. But if you stop and think about that statement, its rather profound, if you take away failure as an outcome. Some would say you take away accountability, but I would say you take away blockers. If you can’t fail, then what is stopping you from trying?

Thomas Edison had a similar statement, when asked about the 1000 failed attempts to make a light bulb, he said “I didn’t fail, I just found 1000 ways not to do it.”

At its core this is very freeing, and we need to say we can grow and push the limits because there is no outcome that we shouldn’t feel positive about, because the journey will yield learnings, and those learnings will help us to improve for the future.

Step 2 : Define your values:

This one took a lot of soul searching for me. You need to take a step back and identify what above all else matters to you. What ideals and values do you aspire to above all else. And that’s not an easy question, and should not be taken lightly. I find that making these values something that need to be quantified in a single word helped a lot.

My values are the following:

  • Family
  • Learning
  • Impact
  • Innovation
  • Creativity

And what I mean by these, is that my guiding principles in my life, at this time are these items. When I am long gone, I want my kids to know that above all else family mattered. I want them to see that I had a love of learning. That I focused on having an impact around me whether it be my career or community. I want them to see me as someone who was innovative and creative.

These values together really some up at this stage of my life, the legacy I want to leave behind.

Step 3 : Values Define Action:

One common thread you will see in anything and everything is the idea that we as people have limited resources. Whether those be willpower, physical, financial, energy, attention, or the all mighty time. We can only put our resources into some much, and we can’t do it all. Greg McKoewn has a great book on this called “Essentialism”, which I really believe is a great book about applying your resources.

To that end, if we have values that are important to us, and we have limited resources. it isn’t a big logical leap to say that we should focus on putting our energy behind the actions that align with our values.

Not really rocket science, although it took me a while to get here if I’m being honest.

Now what I’ve found from doing this in practice in recent months is that I have seen my stress level go down, and my commitment to any actions I’ve taken go up. And results have been greater too. And at the end of the day I believe its easier to be committed to an action if it aligns to something you care deeply about.

Let me go back to our example, as mentioned above I want to get healthier, and I’d tried smart goals, 10x goals, etc. I tried a keto diet, joining a gym, nothing seemed to stick. And even when they did I could never cross the 15 lbs mark. And it was devastating to me. I have had to actively sit on the side lines at both work and family functions because of my body weight.

This all came to a head for me, when I took my son to Hershey, and all he wanted to do was ride a roller coaster, and he’s much too small to ride the big coasters, but we saw a roller coaster called the “coco cruiser” (a little kid roller coaster), and he wanted to ride it. We got in line, and when we got to the front, he was too short to ride by himself, and I couldn’t fit into the coaster. He and I stood on the platform, while his friends rode, and then he rode with one of their mom’s. Having to explain to your son that he can’t have what he wants because of your body weight is one of the lowest points in my life. I wanted to curl up and die.

I still could never get past that 15 lbs mark, and life would get in the way. I took a step back, and said…forget the numbers. I want to get healthy because it will let me be more to my family. I found a cross fit gym that I really like, with great people and a great coach. I try to go as much as I can, unfortunately recently being sick sidelined. But just out of curiosity I got on the scale today, I’m down 25 lbs from that horrible day. I feel better and have better energy, and even though I fell off the wagon and am going back when travel slows down. I feel like a success and look back on all the victories and fulfillment I feel with a positive attitude.

The attention here being on the action, not the outcome. Its having a lasting impact as it leads to behavioral change.

But let’s not make this all about weight, even if that is an easy example. Take my professional life, I decided to focus more on impact and now measuring all my actions by impact they have. This has led to greater results in my office with me feeling better about the work I’ve done, and if you look at the metrics much greater returns. My stress level has gone down, and I’ve stopped measuring myself against the impact and activities of my colleagues.

Final Thoughts:

I know this has been a much longer blog post than normal, but thanks for sticking with me through this. The end result of which is this, I’m not going to be setting any resolutions this year. My new plan is to reaffirm and re-evaluate my values, and then make sure that I devote my energy and resources to actions that align. This will allow me the flexability to enjoy life, while still finding new ways to grow.

This is something my wife and i both feel strongly about and are working with our kids to internalize and I hope it at least sparks some thought for you about where you are and where you want to go.

Goals and Grit

Goals and Grit

Hello All, I wanted to shake things up a little bit and talk about a book I have been working my way through and goals. So its officially January, and a lot of us are looking at the great new year like a blank canvas, waiting to be painted. I have to be honest, I’ve always been a fan of New Years, not the holiday or New Years Eve, although everyone loves a good party night. But every year I enjoy the act of self-reflection and planning that goes into the new year, and the chance to grow and improve.

But the one thing I hate about this process is during the self-reflection, admitting where you came up short. Where did you stumble or fail, what went wrong? Now if I’m being honest I’m a DevOps guy and as a result am big on admitting failure. But if we look at this from a DevOps perspective, teams grow when they fail fast, and on some level this yearly retrospective ritual flies in the face of that.

Lately I’ve been reading a great book call Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance by Angela Duckworth. And it really is an amazing book that will change the way you look as success on the whole. Really it promotes this concept that success is not built on talent, but rather on the determination and passion of the person.

In the beginning of the book she calls out West Point. West Point has one of the most rigorous recruiting processes in history, and they only take the best and brightest into their program. But despite that, they were seeing a very high drop out rate, and couldn’t figure out why. The short version is because the people who are most talented are rarely tested, and if you’ve never had to overcome obstacles before, then you are likely to back down when faced with your first wall.

The book also gives an interesting take on goal planning that I had never done before, and its one that to me makes a lot of sense, and I’m giving it a try this year. So I will have to update the blog here with the results. But the one method she talks about was discussed by Warren Buffet, arguably one of the most successful business men of our time. In the book, he describes a planning process he does, which is to write down 25 goals, 25 things you’d like to accomplish this year. This sounds like a lot, but if you start writing goals, you’ll find its not hard. I hit 30 without breaking a sweat. And then pick from that list the top 5, and put those in the “MUST DO” category.

And take the rest…and put them in the “NOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES” category. The idea is this, your time is your most valuable resource, and multi-tasking is an illusion. So you should focus your attention on these 5, and the other 20 are a distraction. The focus being that being successful isn’t about saying “Yes”, its about saying “No”.

For me this resonates, as if I pour all my attention and time into 5 specific goals, I am way more likely to accomplish them with greater impact. And this also works well with another planning approach that I’ve leveraged before, which is described by Steven Covey’s 7 Habits of Highly Effective People.

In his book, he describes the idea that if you think of your day as a bucket, and I tell you to fit big rocks, little rocks, and sand into the bucket. What is the most logical way to fill it? Big Rocks, then little, then Sand, and if we are being honest we should approach our goals the same way. But most times we don’t, we avoid the big tasks, and small tasks, and fill our day with emails first.

So he recommends breaking things into the following matrix (called the Eisenhower Decision Matrix):

Important / Urgent Important / Not Urgent
Not important / Urgent Not Important / Not Urgent

In this matrix, the idea is that “Important” means that it lines up with your goals, which I would argue are the five goals provided above. From there we can look at what’s urgent and aligns to our goals as where our time should be spent.

  • Q1 of the above box, is for things that are urgent and related to your goals, like deadlines, crisis, opportunities that are time sensitive.
  • Q2 of the above are items that don’t have a pressing deadline but focus on your goal, this should be next on your priority list.
  • Q3 are items that require immediate attention but don’t move us forward. Which should try to minimize these tasks as much as possible. Things like phone calls, emails, etc.
  • Q4 are items which aren’t urgent or important and are basically time wasters, eliminate at all costs.

So leveraging the above matrix, makes it very easy to keep our focus where it should be on our 5 goals, and avoiding the distractions that undermine our success.

How to punch up your resume?

How to punch up your resume?

So I thought given the new direction with this blog, I would focus my attention on some of the questions I get a lot.  And one of the  biggest questions I get asked frequently is “My resume is terrible, how do I make it better?”

To be perfectly honest, most people undervalue their resume, and think of it like some kind of checkbox.  I love hearing people say “I’m not worried, once I go in for the interview the resume is meaningless.”  To which my response is HOW DO YOU THINK YOU GET THE INTERVIEW!

There’s an old adage, that the you never get a second chance to make a first impression, and when applying for jobs, the resume is your first impression.  When I worked for a prior company, part of my job was interviewing new talent and determining if they were a good fit to move the organization forward.  As such, I literally conducted over 100 interviews in a 8 month a period.  I can say I’ve seen a lot of things, and this blog post is really based around the tips that would apply to help get your resume noticed and get you in the interview.

  1. DO NOT stick to one page:  In college they will tell you that your resume must be limited to one page.  That is not realistic for a technical position, because in these positions we are looking for the skills you have.  Don’t go crazy but a good three page resume is a lot better than Times New Roman, size 8 compressed onto a page.  The human eye needs white space more than anything.
  2. Keep it up to date:  This is jumping a little further ahead, but make sure it is 100% current.  I’ve read resumes of people and nothing turns the interviewer off more than to bring you in and here, “Here’s the stuff that I’ve been working on”.
  3. Describe the projects:  Even better than a list of skills is a project description, and acknowledging that you can’t give up all details.  But things like, “Project XYZ was a mobile app built with Xamarin with a Cosmos DB database back end, and I was the lead developer of the mobile side.” tells me a lot about what your skills are.
  4. Be clear about your role:  It helps if you tell me what you did on the project, and be clear about the responsibility not the titles.  I’ll give an example, my first job I was responsible for building software for managing test centers and grading certification exams with the state, but being the state my job title was “LAN Technican”, no even close.  So I found that you should try to change your title, just list what you did on the project.  It gives a clearer picture of what your skills are.
  5. Put in personal projects:  I used to tell people “I can teach someone to code the way I want, but I can’t teach passion”.  So if you’ve contributed to GitHub projects, put it in there, if you have apps in the app store, put them in there.  Talk to me about what you with, that shows perseverance and drive, which I can’t teach.  If you blog list that, if you work with user groups, put that.  I once had a candidate show “my son and I built a cloud enabled race car with a raspberry pi and a cell phone”, that’s fantastic information.  But make sure you limit it to what you’ve done.
  6. Be Honest about how much you’ve worked with something:  It’s a great idea to quantify your technical skills, you can use a 1-10 scale, or some other measure, on my resume I use a 1-5 scale.  This allows them to get a good assessment of your skills and saves everyone time.  And to be honest this is another one where you show “I’m learning Xamarin on my own” is huge.  Expect that during the technical interview you are going to be grilled on all these, and if you aren’t honest, that’s a guaranteed out (next post we talk about the technical interview).

 

Welcome to Mack Bytes

Welcome to Mack Bytes

Hello all, consider this the inaugural post of the new Mack Bytes blog.  Welcome!  I’ve chosen to sort of rebrand this blog, and sort of relaunch it for a couple of reasons.  The first and foremost of which is that the other blog has sort of faded.

To be honest I started that blob it feels like a life-time ago, and it was started with the intention of creating a blog to provide articles that were intended to be “how-to” guides, and other targeted posts strictly only on software development.  And there’s nothing wrong with that, but if I’m being honest, I had trouble continually updating it, and it felt like every post started with “Let me start by apologizing for the lack of updates”.  And that’s not a good place to be.  I also feel like my life has changed actually quite a bit recently, and I sort of wanted to refocus my efforts.  So over the past year I’ve been doing a lot of thinking, and planning.  And this has all been geared around life goals and direction.  And I really wanted to relaunch this blog with the intention of being more than it was before.  Don’t get me wrong I’m a big nerd at heart, so there will always be the technical posts, but this newly branded blog is more about changing to being a general blog to help people as I figure this stuff out for myself.

In essence, I’m inviting you all on my journey.  So I’ve found myself at the tender age of 35, and realized that the journey that got me to where I am is very different from the plan when I graduated college, and I’m looking forward to where I can go next.  But really for me to do that, a lot of factors have to be considered.  And a lot will likely happen along the way.  I will be using this blog as a platform to help people and share insights.  And I will also be leveraging other social media platforms as a way of driving those messages.  So if you like what you see here, please pass it along to someone else, if you don’t please talk to me.  I’d love to start a dialog exchange if you disagree with my thoughts, actions, or beliefs.  Dialog is the best way to really grow, and challenging dialog has a way of making you re-examine your beliefs and actions.

So here we go, the first post of the new blog, looking forward to more.